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Today's Health Headlines
Swiss drugmaker Roche's hopes of recapturing lost ground in the generics-flooded influenza market got a boost after a late-stage study showed its new medicine reduced symptoms in people at high risk of complications.

A federal judge ruled on Monday against birth control organizations that sought to block the Trump administration from shifting a federal family-planning grant program toward prioritizing groups that are faith-based and counsel abstinence.

A court hearing on a Texas law requiring the burial or cremation of aborted fetal tissue opened on Monday with the state arguing the requirement was a matter of dignity, while abortion providers called it unnecessary and aimed at impeding clinic operations.

(Reuters Health) - Young women with unhealthy levels of fats in their blood may have higher odds of having just one child, or no children at all, a recent study suggests.

Silicon Valley e-cigarette start-up Juul Labs is bringing its small flash drive-sized vaping device to the United Kingdom this week, aiming to reproduce its break-neck U.S. growth overseas.

A mass radio campaign in Burkina Faso led to a significant rise in sick children getting medical attention and could prove one of the most cost-effective ways to save young lives in poor countries, researchers said on Tuesday.

The use of gene editing technologies to alter the DNA of human embryos could be morally permissible as long as the science and its impact on society is carefully considered, a British ethics panel said on Tuesday.

Yes, it's harder to sleep in the hospital
Mon, 16 Jul 2018 18:21:29 -0400
(Reuters Health) - Hospital patients get a lot less sleep, wake up more frequently during the night, and rise earlier in the morning than they would in bed at home, a Dutch study suggests.

(Reuters Health) - While most adults know nicotine is bad for children, smokers and some other individuals aren't convinced of this fact, according to a U.S. study that suggests a need for more public education about the risks of tobacco.

(Reuters Health) - Patients with common colds and respiratory illnesses may be more likely to get antibiotics - which don't work for these conditions - when they go to an urgent care clinic, a U.S. study suggests.

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